Books to look out for this Spring

The freaky February weather is behind us, those treacherous early Spring storms seem to have passed, and there are signs of Spring – things are sprouting in my garden (apart from all those snowdrops I planted last Autumn – hmm!) and it is warm enough to take the thick down lining out of my winter coat. The London Book Fair has been taking place this week, with all those publishers deciding what we are going to be reading in the coming months, and there are some fantastic new books to look out for. With the Easter holidays coming up in the next month or so, you may be looking for something to read yourself. Here are some of the newly published or soon to be published books that have caught my eye

The FiveThe Five by Hallie Rubenhold

This book has been getting a lot of coverage and tells the stories of the women raped and murdered in Victorian London by Jack the Ripper. Reclaiming a space for these women, the author seeks to make them more than just victims.

 

 

 

 

BookwormBookworm: a memoir of childhood reading by Lucy Mangan

I have been reading Lucy Mangan’s columns in The Guardian for years and have always loved her writing style. I have also always identified with the passion for reading she found she had as an introverted child. This looks like a nice read and one that will take you back to characters and places you may also have loved as a child.

 

 

SpringSpring by Ali Smith

The third in Ali Smith’s seasonal quartet. Autumn was published in 2016 and was shortlisted for the Man Booker in that year. Winter was published in 2017 (still on my TBR list) and here we now have Spring, due for publication on 28 March. It concerns the lives of three people living in a time of war in a country facing a crisis of identity. Remind you of anywhere?

 

 

 

girl balancingGirl, Balancing by Helen Dunmore

Having just completed Birdcage Walk, I’m really keen to get into some more Helen Dunmore and this collection of short stories looks like a perfect one to take on holiday. I don’t read very many short stories so this will be a bit of a departure for me.

 

 

 

LannyLanny by Max Porter

Just read a review of this and it sounds so intriguing that I can’t wait to get hold of it. Set in a small village not far from London, this book is about the many residents past and present who have lived there, and about the culture, history and folklore of the place, embodied by the slumbering woodland spirit Dead Papa Toothwort.

 

 

 

That should keep me going for a while!

What books are you looking forward to reading this Spring?

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What’s new in kids’ books for Spring

Last week, I posted about some of the books being published for Spring that look like good reads. This week I’ve been scouring the children’s section and here are some titles that have caught my eye.

sky song

Sky Song by Abi Elphinstone

Recommended for 8+.

Frozen lands, snow, and the animals associated with it, have long been fascinating subjects for children’s books, whether it’s CS Lewis’s Narnia, Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials, or indeed Santa Claus, and there are a clutch of such books around at the moment. This book is set in the frozen kingdom of Erkenwald which is tyranically ruled by the Ice Queen. It is an adventure story where a girl, Eska, breaks free from a music box where she has been held prisoner, and her friend Flint, a young boy. Together they have the potential to break the power of the Ice Queen.

 

tinTin by Padraig Kenny

Recommended for 9+.

The cover makes me think this could be a modern day Wizard of Oz. It’s a debut novel from an Irish author and the central character is Christopher, an orphan who works for an engineer who manufactures ‘mechanicals’, a kind of robot. These become Christopher’s best friends and with them he sets out on a journey, following a devastating accident, and discovers things about himself and about what it means to be human.

 

the light jarThe Light Jar by Lisa Thompson

Recommended for 9-12.

Lisa Thompson’s first book, The Goldfish Boy, about a boy suffering from debilitating OCD, was hugely popular and has been shortlisted for Waterstones Children’s Book Prize 2018. This follow-up deals with similarly contemporary issues. Nate and his mother leave their home in the middle of the night. Nate’s mother does not explain why, but Nate thinks it has to do with her boyfriend Gary. When Nate’s Mum goes out for groceries and does not return Nate finds himself alone. He receives a visit from an old friend and between them they go on an adventure which may or may not help Nate resolve his troubles and be reunited with his Mum.

 

the-unpredictability-of-being-humanThe Unpredictability of Being Human by Linni Ingemundsen

Recommended for Young Adult readers

In this debut novel from a young Norwegian author, the central character is 15 year-old Malin who is struggling to cope with her dysfunctional family. Her father seems always angry, her mother has a drink problem and her older brother is remote, XBox-obsessed and gets into trouble. She also struggles with friendships at school until she finally meets Hanna, a girl with problems of her own, and together they navigate the challenges of growing up. A novel about fitting-in and finding your own way, against the odds, that will resonate with young female teens.

 

the final sixThe Final Six by Alexandra Monir

Recommended for 13+

It can be hard to find reading material that appeals to teenage boys, but this one might do the trick. Due out in early March it is action-packed science fiction, and has already been bought by Sony pictures for a film adaptation. Leo and Naomi are selected from among the world’s brightest teenagers for a mission to Europa, Jupiter’s moon, in order to establish a human colony, so grave has the threat to Earth become. As they undergo the rigorous training programme, Leo and Naomi begin to question the true motive of the mission, and become suspicious of their masters’ intentions.

 

things a bright girl can doThings A Bright Girl Can Do by Sally Nicholls

Recommended for Young Adult readers.

An appropriate one for the month in which we celebrate the extension of voting rights to some women in the UK. This novel brings together three girls, Evelyn, May and Nell, each from very different backgrounds but who find common cause in the women’s suffrage movement. Evelyn enjoys a privileged lifestyle but resents the fact that the only expectation of her in life is to marry according to her family’s wishes, while her brother gets to go to university. May and Nell, from very different backgrounds, meet and fall in love, strictly forbidden at that time, and face their own challenges but are equally moved by the cause for women’s equality. This novel follows their separate stories whilst exploring the issues of the suffrage movement in the context of the era.

I hope there is something here that might pique the interest of some young people you know. Take them along to the bookshop or library to find out. And if they do read any of them, I’d love to hear what they think.

What books for kids have you seen that appeal to you?

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